Declaration Of Sentiments And Resolutions

Declaration Of Sentiments And Resolutions

Women?s suffrage has been a long and difficult road for all involved, especially at its earlier stages. Just as we have founding fathers that framed the Constitution and Declaration of Independence, there were also many women to whom we owe many of our liberties. The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 was a time to confer about the public and political condition and the civil liberties of women. At this convention, the women who drafted the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions, Elizabeth Stanton and Lucretia Mott, followed the structure of the Declaration of Independence for guidance. Their declaration imitates or parodies Jefferson?s declaration so that it displays the intelligence of Stanton to compare the two. Although the King of England is replaced with the ?tyrant man,? both documents still share many similarities, as well as differences.
The Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions are similar in that they share the same structure. The way in which they are written follows an almost identical pattern. The beginning of the documents details the purpose of each declaration and those who it is representing. The following section conveys the grievances that are

declaration, women, independence, resolutions, sentiments, king, men, both, while, two, states, stanton?s, stanton, over, england, documents, share, same, power, order, jefferson?s, government, done, different, being, authority, wrong, written, way, war, voice, view, united, under, time

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *